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Summer

History

Topic - Monarchy

Key Skills/Knowledge

  • The chronology of the Kings and Queens since 1066.
  • The changing powers of British monarchy to include:
    • King John
    • Kings James I and VI
    • Henry VII and his children
    • King Charles I
    • King Charles II
    • Kings James II and VII 
    • William and Mary
    • Queen Anne
    • Queen Victoria

Science

Topic - Properties and Changes of Materials

Key Skills/Knowledge

  • Compare and group together everyday materials based on their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets.
  • Know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution.
  • Use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating.
  • Give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic.
  • Demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes.
  • Explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda.
  • Planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary.
  • Taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.
  • Recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs.
  • Using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests  
  • Reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.
  • Identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

 

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