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Autumn

History

Topic - Stone Age to Iron Age

Key Skills/Knowledge

Children learn about life in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, a period of a million years in history.  As well as understanding the chronology, children will learn about food, religion, homes and technology and how these things developed over the time period.

Chronological Understanding:  

  • Place the time studied on a time line.
  • Use dates and terms related to the study unit and passing time.
  • Sequence several events or artefacts.

Range and depth of historical knowledge: 

  • Find out about everyday lives of people in time studied.
  • Compare with our life today.
  • Identify reasons and results of people’s actions.
  • Understand why people may have wanted to do something 

Interpretations of history: 

  • Look at evidence available.
  • Begin to evaluate the usefulness of different sources.
  • Use text books and historical knowledge.

Historical enquiry: 

  • Use a range of sources to find out about a period.
  • Observe small details – artefacts, pictures.
  • Select and record information relevant to the study.
  • Begin to use the library and internet for research.

Science

Topic - Rocks

Key Skills/Knowledge

  • Compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties.
  • Describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock.
  • Recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.
  • Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them.
  • Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests.
  • Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers.
  • Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions.
  • Recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables.
  • Reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusion.
  • Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions.
  • Identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes.
  • Use straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Key Vocabulary

  • Names of rocks – Chalk, limestone, granite, basalt, sandstone, flint, slate, shale, marble 
  • Types of rock – Sedimentary, metamorphic, igneous 
  • Types of minerals – Calcite, feldspar, topaz, diamond, talc, corundum 
  • Properties of rocks – Hard/soft, permeable/impermeable 
  • Processes – Heat, pressure, erosion, transportation, deposition, melt, solidify 
  • Size of rocks – Grain, pebbles 
  • Rock describing words – Crystals, layers 
  • Early areas of land – Gondwana, Pangea 
  • Land formations – Plates, volcanoes, mountains, valleys 

 

Science

Topic - Light

Key Skills/Knowledge

  • Recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light.
  • Notice that light is reflected from surfaces.  
  • Recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes.
  • Recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque object.
  • Find patterns in the way that the size of shadows changes.
  • Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them.
  • Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests.
  • Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers.
  • Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions.
  • Recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables.
  • Reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusion.
  • Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions.
  • Identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes.
  • Use straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.
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